Plastic Eating Insects

Scientists determined that Galleria mellonella is mainly habitated on plastic waste menagements. Those worms are actually eating plastics! Could it save planets problem of too much plastic waste? It is a nice research

Plastic eating worms

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I heard about this through the kids’ podcast, WOW in the world – it’s intriguing, but I’m not sure it’s the whole solution.

Lets melt & reuse the big stuff. However we also need “decontamination”…with all the little broken down un recyclable pieces. I like the microorganism idea here. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/bacteria-able-to-eat-plastic-bottles-discovered-by-scientists-a6927636.html
I found out the worms become moths that are bad for the bees : (

Researchers have found Microorganisms eating plastics!!
Plastics are being vastly used today and it solves lot of our daily need problems but at the same time is big concern for the environment
As per reports in 2014, 25.8 million tonnes of post-consumer plastics ended up as waste. So lot of research is being done to reduce the impact of waste plastics on our environment
The research carried out in Pakistan is to degrade Polyurethane with the help of Fungus. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways and it confirmed. This was the first report as is a good effort to solve the problem. But it is yet to be seen if it can be done on large scale and is commercially viable.

Suggestive Reading:
https://www.plasticsinsight.com/research-shows-fungus-can-degrade-polyurethane-pu/

Plastics are being vastly used today and it solves lot of our daily need problems but at the same time is big concern for the environment
As per reports in 2014, 25.8 million tonnes of post-consumer plastics ended up as waste. So lot of research is being done to reduce the impact of waste plastics on our environment
The research carried out in Pakistan is to degrade Polyurethane with the help of Fungus. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways and it confirmed. This was the first report as is a good effort to solve the problem. But it is yet to be seen if it can be done on large scale and is commercially viable.

Suggestive Reading:
https://www.plasticsinsight.com/research-shows-fungus-can-degrade-polyurethane-pu/

Plastics are being vastly used today and it solves lot of our daily need problems but at the same time is big concern for the environment
As per reports in 2014, 25.8 million tonnes of post-consumer plastics ended up as waste. So lot of research is being done to reduce the impact of waste plastics on our environment
The research carried out in Pakistan is to degrade Polyurethane with the help of Fungus. The PU degrading ability of the fungus was tested in three different ways and it confirmed. This was the first report as is a good effort to solve the problem. But it is yet to be seen if it can be done on large scale and is commercially viable.

Suggestive Reading:
https://www.plasticsinsight.com/research-shows-fungus-can-degrade-polyurethane-pu/

Recently, at a Zero Waste Conference in Vancouver, I heard a scientist from the UK speaking about this (he mentioned it while discussing compostable plastics) and he viewed it negatively because the insects just excrete smaller particles of plastic.

FS

Initial research has shown it to be a promising solution, but not in the sense of breeding an army of the insects. One of the major problems posed by introducing these moths in large numbers is that the Wax Moth, as the one being referenced here is more
commonly called, is the one of bees’ primary predators, as they feed on the beeswax that makes up the beehives. In breeding them on a large scale, we may inadvertently wipe out global bee populations, which are already at dangerously low levels. Currently, the scientific community is researching the bacteria found in the digestive tract of the Wax Moth, as it is the bacteria that they believe to make it possible for this Moth to do so. Such bacteria has been found in the digestive systems of other moths as well (though none so efficient as the Wax Moth) so it is hoped that in learning more about this bacteria, we may use the bacteria itself or may recreate the enzymes that the bacteria produce that allow for the breaking down of these materials

There is no unique plastic. Some insects may learn to break down PE plastic for example but not the other various existing types, and the difficulty increases with plastic resin mixes and additives !

Plastic eating insects can be a research topic but should be put in a controlled environment, since their spread can cause trouble wherever useful plastic products exist 🙂

Hi, I read the article, initially it seems promising, but thinking about this a little longer, it is no solution at all. I believe that humans should stop (ab)using animals to solve the problems we create. These worms may even make the problem bigger, what about the stuff that comes out after they eat plastic, will their shit be plastic microbeads? That will be even harder to clean up. So, no this is not promising at all…

realy thats not a sollution. because we produce plastic much more than this insects could eat.